Discussion of virtue in meno by socrates

Meno can you tell me, socrates, whether virtue is acquired by teaching or by practice or if neither by teaching nor practice, then whether it comes to man by nature, or in what other way. Socrates provokes a discussion regarding virtue when he states that, i have never known of anyone else who did [know virtue], in my judgment this prompted meno to stand up and prove to socrates he could accurately define virtue. There are distinct virtues for every age and every action that there is a difference between the virtues of a man, a woman, an old man and a child socrates thinks that there is no difference between the virtues of a man, a woman, an old man and a child. The meno is probably one of plato's earliest dialogues, with the conversation dateable to about 402 bce the dialogue begins with meno asking socrates whether virtue can be taught, and this question (along with the more fundamental question of what virtue is) occupies the two men for the entirety of the text. This begins the discussion in the second half of meno, and sets up the discovery and assertion by socrates (plato) of what the nature of knowledge is (they cant answer the question of virtue yet, even at the end of the piece.

Discussion of virtue in meno by socrates 664 words jan 28th, 2018 3 pages in the dialogue, socrates creates several differing arguments on virtue, which include the definition of virtue and questions on whether persons can attain it. This video focuses on plato's dialogue, the meno, examines the attempts made in that dialogue to define virtue, and looks at socrates' objections to meno's proposed definitions. Socrates' discussion with meno begins as meno asks whether virtue can be taught meno suggests that it may be a result of practice or an inherent trait socrates answers by reminding meno that meno's own countrymen, the thessalians, have recently gained a reputation for wisdom, due chiefly to the rising fame of gorgias (a sophist teacher.

Virtue is knowledge is an extraordinary accomplishment: suffused with insight, gracefully written, and powerfully argued it will challenge much of the received wisdom about the meaning of the socratic 'paradox' and set down important signposts for students of socrates who wish to understand the full dimensions of his defense of philosophy and its significance for moral and political life. Discussion of virtue in meno by socrates 664 words | 3 pages plato reveals the views of socrates on the query of whether virtue is knowledge and whether virtue may be taught in a number of dialogues, mainly in meno. Meno (/ ˈ m iː n oʊ / greek: μένων, menōn) is a socratic dialogue written by platoit appears to attempt to determine the definition of virtue, or arete, meaning virtue in general, rather than particular virtues, such as justice or temperance.

Meno, like the good socratic interlocutor that he is, declares that he knows what virtue is without a doubt and thus, socrates' and meno's pursuit into virtue and how one acquires it begins however, the discussion turns to the subject of knowledge and how it is acquired many times throughout the dialogue. Socrates' response: the ability to rule men is only good if the rule is just but justice is only one of the virtues so meno has defined the general concept of virtue by identifying it with one specific kind of virtue. When meno first asks socrates how virtue is acquired, socrates tells him that he does not know and cannot know since he does not know what virtue itself is he asks meno if anyone could know if meno were rich or good looking without knowing meno at all. Philosophy 430 paper 1 over the course of his discussion with socrates, meno provides socrates with three definitions for „virtue‟ first, meno tells socrates that [t]here is a virtue for every. Questions on the meno 7oal-4 in light of the background of meno and what he knows of socrates, (79e7-80 a 3) and the conditions of his presence in athens (76e) consider the abruptness of the opening of the dialogue.

Meno asks if virtue can be taught, and socrates claims not to know what virtue is meno responds by saying that gorgias states that virtue is different for different people, and the virtue of men is different than that of women, slaves different from free men, and adults different from children. In plato's classic dialogue, the meno, socrates and meno discuss the nature of moral virtue (or excellence in moral goodness), whether it can be defined, and whether it can be taught. In fifth-century athens, socrates insisted on the importance of the fundamental ethical question—how shall i live—and his pupil, plato, and plato's pupil, aristotle, developed elaborate philosophical systems to explain the nature of reality, knowledge, and human happiness. Socrates answers by reminding meno that meno's own countrymen, athenians do not claim to be able to answer any such questions xenophon's description of meno (from th. Meno continues by saying that there is a virtue for women and children as well, these virtues differing greatly from the virtues of men socrates seems unimpressed he tells meno that there must be some singular ideal of virtue and not merely an inexhaustible list of examples.

Discussion of virtue in meno by socrates

Meno is confused and socrates clarifies his idea that there are times when a man possessing true opinion (as socrates and meno have of virtue) can be as helpful as a man possessing knowledge of the same thing. (3) virtue is to desire beautiful things and have the power to acquire them [77b] 2 socrates's objections: socrates is interested in knowing the ultimate essence (ousia) of virtue ie the underlying form that makes all virtuous deeds, virtuous [72d] instead, in his first definition, meno lists instances of virtue. Published: mon, 5 dec 2016 meno is a socratic dialogue written by plato it is a dialogue between socrates and meno it starts with meno questioning socrates about virtue, about how virtue can be taught.

  • The discussion is shortly brought back to the original topic, whether virtue can be taught meno wants socrates' own view of the matter however, socrates replies that he cannot deal directly.
  • The discussion, socrates expresses this by getting meno to admit that he is not teaching the slave, but only reminding him, the conclusion, i take it, is (2): it turns out that there is no such distinction (between teaching and reminding) to.

Socrates: meno at the beginning of meno the question of what virtue is and whether or not it can be taught is brought up the question of whether knowledge is virtue or virtue is knowledge is also brought up in the text. in plato's meno, socrates and meno do not obtain a definition of virtue, while socrates thinks that virtue is a kind of knowledge, and if virtue is knowledge, then it should be able to be both defined and taught.

discussion of virtue in meno by socrates Virtue of the answer socrates has given to the paradox in the digression, meno has at least recovered enough energy and hope for resolution to return to the initial question, which was, as you recall, whether virtue is teachable. discussion of virtue in meno by socrates Virtue of the answer socrates has given to the paradox in the digression, meno has at least recovered enough energy and hope for resolution to return to the initial question, which was, as you recall, whether virtue is teachable. discussion of virtue in meno by socrates Virtue of the answer socrates has given to the paradox in the digression, meno has at least recovered enough energy and hope for resolution to return to the initial question, which was, as you recall, whether virtue is teachable. discussion of virtue in meno by socrates Virtue of the answer socrates has given to the paradox in the digression, meno has at least recovered enough energy and hope for resolution to return to the initial question, which was, as you recall, whether virtue is teachable.
Discussion of virtue in meno by socrates
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